Never Say Die

You hear it all of the time “Never Say Die”. You see the athlete in competition, whether its MMA, a Grappling Match, a Track Meet or a Football game – the sport does not matter, only the actions that lead to the end result. The participant is behind and it seems as if all is lost and then the tide shifts and the athlete that appeared to be done for surges and emerges victorious.

Everyone wants to win. Wanting to win is not the hard part. Sacrificing everyday in your training, your eating habits and ignoring distractions; that is the difficult task. You need to make your training your priority – no room for excuses – make it to your workouts and push yourself to get better, stronger and faster. Excuses for failure are common, find a way to succeed.

How does this happen? How does one develop this “Never Say Die” attitude? Can it be developed? Or is it only in certain people?

There are certain people born with an innate inner toughness, but if it’s not cultivated, they burn out and lose it over time. Others seem to develop, grow tougher and more resilient over time. How is this done?

There is one sure fire way to develop this Never Say Die attitude, Train Hard. Yes, the more that you sacrifice and persevere, the more you become committed to succeed and less you are able to tolerate failure. There are many times when a combatant is in a scramble, they could easily give in and let their opponent win, yet they do not allow this to happen. The time, effort and pain endured in training comes through and they “dig deep” into their soul and put forth another effort. Training with purpose will not only harden your body, but your mind as well.

When you are training, think to yourself “What is my opponent doing? Is he training like I am? Is he sparring those extra rounds, running that additional mile and performing those few more reps? Is he pushing through the pain?” You will never be able to answer those questions, until after the contest. The best chance of success that you have is to train to your best ability and don’t make excuses for not training.

The more that you put in, the more that you will be prepared to win. Take the Samurai for example. They were in Life and Death Battles. If they lost, they were dead. In order to win, they needed to have supreme confidence. They developed this confidence through their daily training regiment and discipline. The tenants espoused by the Samurai are ones that we can base our training on to develop our Never Say Die attitude.

As Always – Train Hard & Train Often.

My Best Friend: Are you a fitness enthusiast that takes their running shoes on trips, only to feel uncomfortable road running in unfamiliar areas? Are you tired of endlessly waiting for cardio equipment to free up at your gym, only to feel like a hamster running on a wheel? Do you love to run outdoors, yet shy away from putting on five layers of under-armor and sweats on in order to brave the sub arctic temperatures?

Well, let me introduce you to my “Best Friend”, the jump rope. You can take it anywhere, you do not need much space, it does not matter what the weather is like outside, you do not need expensive equipment ($2.00 to $20.00 for a rope, my favorite costs $8.00) and you can vary the routines and movements to keep it interesting. My Grandfather was a boxing trainer in Paterson, NJ back in the 30’s, 40’s and into the 50’s. He instructed me on how to jump rope as a teenager as a means to improve my foot speed and endurance for wrestling and football. I then began to realize the incredible benefits of jumping rope.

If you jump rope at a good pace for 5 minutes, it’s equivalent to running a mile! The coordination of your hands and feet moving in rhythm with each other is essential for a fighter. All of my martial arts classes begin with 3 to 5 minutes of jumping rope. In addition to the coordination development, jumping rope is an incredible means to warm up the body.

Even if you are a beginner and you miss on your jump, keep moving your feet. To learn how to jump, here are a couple of tips:

1) Play some music that you like with a good beat. You should put together a playlist for at least the same amount of time that you want to jump for. Use your favorite, upbeat songs & make a mix. Or, for those with obsessive, manic personalities, repeat the same song as an extended version. This also helps you jump rope longer. You basically fool your self into NOT thinking that you are jumping that long.

2) To initially get your timing, watch as the rope hits the ground. That’s when you time your jump. It may take a few weeks to get your timing, but keep working, it will eventually happen.

3) If you are still having issues, try putting the rope in one hand and jump up and down while rotating your wrist. This will help you to find your timing.

4) Remember the less movement of your arms, the better. Your wrists are the primary focus of the rotation. Try also to keep them in the same spot, approximately at the level between the bottom of your chest and the top of your hips. This does not hold true when you are doing more advanced movements, like crossing the rope or double jumps.

5) You do not have to jump very high. You only need to jump high enough to allow the thin rope to pass under your feet. Get your rhythm and all else will fall into place.

If you’d like to workout the rest of your body, try performing push-ups and abdominal exercises in a rotation with jumping rope. You can start with 100 jumps, 20 push – ups and 30 abdominals. Start with 3 rotations and then increase to 5. You may also execute additional push – ups or abdominals. What a great way to start the day!

Victory Favors the Prepared!

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If you have any questions or comments, feel free to reach me at  HYPERLINK “http://www.philross.com” www.philross.com.

Muscle Confusion: Hype or Reality? 

Since the advent of the P90X video series, the notion of “Muscle Confusion” seems to be on everyone’s lips and has replaced conversations of Core Based Workouts as the main concern for fitness enthusiasts. We’ll tackle the notion of the elusive “Core” in another blog.

Muscle confusion has been a very popular training method for many, many years. Yes – the P90X does a good job at leading you through your daily routine, but the program does not take into consideration the varying degrees of fitness, athletic ability, age and other stressors that the potential customer base may possess. I am not here to bash the P90X series. On one hand it has inspired many people to lose weight, get in shape and improve their lives, on the other hand many people have become injured while using it. I have personally worked with several clients, of various ages, that came to me after doing the PX90 series and incurring injuries. People have injured their backs, knees, hips and shoulders.

If you read the book by Arnold Schwartzeneggar: The Education of A Bodybuilder. I read this book in 1978 and it had an incredible impact on me. While attending the University of Maryland I participated in a workout session with the Barbarian Brothers, Peter & David Paul. They were filming of the movie DC Cab with Mr. T & Gary Bussey. My friend’s dad owned the Gold’s Gym in Wheaton, Maryland and he invited a few of us guys down for the workout session. The book by Arnold, the workout session with the Barbarian Brothers and countless other strength and fitness athletes have always stressed “Varying the Workout”, “Shock the Muscles”, “Change your Routine”. That is the only true way to stimulate growth and achieve higher levels of fitness.

Why is it so important? Why can’t I just stick with my set of exercises? Why can’t I simply run the same amount and the same route every time? Why – because the body gets stale with the same routine. You need to “force” the body to respond to varied loads and/or movements. Soreness from your workout should be the norm. If you do not experience soreness on a regular basis, you are not developing. If you have hit platues with your strength or your times running or find that you are dreading training; you need to varying your routine. Not to mention the fact of repetitive stress injuries that the same routine breed.

When you do your roadwork, you need to vary the terrain, the distance and the level of intensity that you run. Example: If you run three times a week, session one, do a 3 mile mile run at 80 percent your capability. Next session, do interval training or what runners call the “Float”. Go to the track and run a 200 hard, then at 50%. Do this for several laps, in accordance to your fitness level and ability. The third session of the week, go for a long run at an easy pace, 65 to 70%. This is just an example for one week. I’ll address running programs in more detail in future blogs.

Kettlebell Training: Lends itself to Muscle Confusion better than any other method available. Personally, I know several hundred movement variations with the Kettlebell. There are also a plethora of workout delivery methods with a Kettlebell. Complexes, Chains, Powerdure, 4×8’s, Combined Kettlebell and Body weight routines, Scrambled eggs, Strength, Endurance, Flexibility, Explosive Power Focus. One of the differentiators  with Kettlebells, is that you have the ability to either focus on one of the phases of training or mix and match the methods in any combination that make sense or that keeps your workout interesting. You also need to employ the various levels of intensity to your workouts. You can’t go 100% every workout. This is another subject that I will cover in greater detail in a future blog. Hey – I have to keep you coming back for more!

Yes – Muscle Confusion is a reality and has great merit, but it’s not new or revolutionary – It’s just simply good.

Train Hard & Train Often!

Adult & Teen Mixed Martial Arts:

Our comprehensive martial training program consists of the many facets of the Martial Arts, making our system a complete Mixed Martial Art. Our system is comprised primarily of the following arts: Burmese Bando, Korean Taekwondo, Filipino Arnis & Kali, Western Wrestling & Boxing, Japanese & Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Shamrock Submission Fighting, Jeet Kun Do Principals, as well as Defensive Tactics of various forms. We address the Stand-up, Ground Fighting, Weapons Application & Defense as well as the transitions from one phase to the other by implementing the Four Ranges of Combat.

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The next Promotional Exam will be held on two days. Adults & Teens on Friday, Dec. 13th, 2013 @ 7:30pm

Children on Saturday, Dec. 10:15am. No MMA Classes on that day. Kettlebells & BJJ at the usual times. 

AEMMA Calendar of Events

Test Announcement_Sept_2013

TEST Form

 

Date                                                                                     Event

Sat. Oct. 26th, 3:00 to 4:30 American Eagle MMA Halloween Party! Bring your friends.
Sat. Oct. 26th, 5:00pm to ???? Mikayla Walsh’s Junior Black Belt Test.
Sun. Oct. 27th 2:00 – 3:30pm Isagenix and Fitness presentation please see Miss Cathy for details.
Oct. 31st 4:30-7:00pm No Children’s Classes for Halloween
Sun, Nov. 3rd, 8:00-6:00pm HKC Certification in Ho-Ho-Kus @ American Eaglehttp://www.dragondoor.com/workshops/details/hkc313/
Fri., Nov. 8th-10th RKC Certification, NYChttp://www.dragondoor.com/workshops/details/wpkb119/
Sat., Nov. 16th NAGA North American Championships, West Orange Armory
Sun. Nov. 24th Faustini’s Fall Classic Children’s Karate Tournament. River Edge.
Wed., Nov. 27th 8:00pm Adult & Teen 8:00pm MMA class canceled.
Thur, Nov. 28th School Closed for Thanksgiving
Fri., Nov. 29th, 1:00 Black Belt & Instructor Training
Sat & Sun. Dec. 7th & 8th 2:30 & 1:00pm Brian Walters 2nd Degree Black Belt Test
Fri., Dec. 13th 7:30pm Adult & Teen Winter Promotional Exam
Sat., Dec. 14th. No MMA Classes for Adults & Children on Saturday
Sat., Dec. 14th 10:15am Children’s Winter Promotional Exam

Master Phil Ross - 7th Degree Black Belt

              Master Phil Ross                       8th Degree Black Belt

 

Master Phil Ross’ Accomplishments and Credentials:

  • 2010 – NAGA – Expert Director No-Gi Champion Battle at the Beach
  • 2010 – RKC Team Leader – Kettlebell Trainer
  • 2010 – CK-FMS Certified Functional Movement Specialist
  • 2010 – Head Wrestling Coach, Mahwah HS
  • 2009 – US Navy SEALs Kettlebell Trainer
  • 2008- RKC Level II Certified Instructor
  • 2008- NJSAII Region ll Wrestling Hall of Fame Assistant Coach of the Year
  • 2007- RKC Certified Instructor, Russian Kettlebells
  • 2007 – Promoted to 7th Degree Black Belt, Professor Level – East/West Martial Arts Alliance
  • 2007 – Chief Trainer & Head of Security for the NJ Girls All Star Soccer Team, Brazil Ginga Tour
  • 2007- NJ State Licensed Professional MMA/Kickboxing/Boxing Manager & Trainer
  • 2006- Mahwah HS Wrestling Coach, NBIAL Champions, State Sectional Qualifier
  • 2005- Certified Shamrock Submission Fighting Level II Instructor
  • 2004- Certified Shamrock Submission Fighting Level I Instructor
  • 2004- Nominated to the Action Martial Arts Hall of Fame
  • 2003- American Fitness Professionals & Associates Certified Personal Trainer
  • 2002- Appointed to the Front Site Training Commission for Hand to Hand Defensive Tactics
  • 2000- Garden State Games Karate Black Belt Heavyweight Sparring Champion
  • 2000- Garden State Games Karate Masters’ Kata Champion
  • 1999- Certified CDT Master Tactical Instructor
  • 1998 – Medalist in Weapons, Forms and Freestyle Fighting at the Bando Nationals
  • 1997- President Elect of the International Federation of Fighting Arts
  • 1997- NRA Certified in Use of Handguns for Protection Purposes
  • 1997 – Featured in the publication of the CDT Police and Bodyguard Manual
  • 1996 – MVP Award in the New York vs. New Jersey Team Challenge
  • 1996 – United Kung Fu Federation – Competitor of the Year Award
  • 1995 – Amateur National Heavyweight Freestyle Fighting Champion
  • 1995 – Garden State Games Empty hand and Weapons Dual Medalist
  • 1994 – World Martial Arts Hall of Fame – “Man of the Year”
  • 1994 – Certified Instructor – NJ Dept. of Criminal Justice – Defensive Tactics
  • 1994 – Captain of Garden State Games – Black Belt Championship Team
  • 1994 – Captain of World Karate Union – Team New Jersey
  • 1993 – Instructor for the State of the Art Security Training Commission
  • 1993 – NJ State AAU Tae Kwon Do Chairman
  • 1993 – IFFA Executive Board of Directors
  • 1992 – Bronze Medalist – AAU Tae Kwon Do Nationals
  • 1991 – Bodyguard Chemical Deterrent Training Course Certification (Pepper Spray)
  • 1989 – Featured Performer ABC Wide World of Sports “Oriental World of Self Defense”
  • 1989 – Garden State Games Karate – Black Belt Heavyweight Gold Medalist
  • 1988 – Big Apple Challenge Heavyweight Karate Champion
  • 1987 – Reebok Classic Power lifting Champion (1400 lbs. Lifted in the 181 lb class)
  • 1983 – Mr. DC – Middleweight Bodybuilding, 3rd Place
  • 1982 – University of Maryland Olympic lifting Champion – 181 lbs.
  • 1981 – Empire State Games Karate Champion
  • 1981 – Mr. Wilkes Bodybuilding Champion
  • 1979 – AAU Junior Olympic Greco-Roman National Runner-up