Get stronger while watching TV?!?!?!? Is this one of those nonsensical claims that require you to send in $14.99 every month for 6 months and you’ll receive some funky, plastic and foam device that will fall apart before you finish paying for it. No, this is much more simple – yet it does require effort.

Here’s an example – I posted it on my FaceBook page the other night and got some interesting responses as well as a bunch of people starting to do the same thing.

While on vacation, we were watching the Godfather on AMC. I was feeling a little antsy, so I decided to do some push-ups during the commercials. The commercial breaks were pretty long, so I did between 25 and 50 reps on each break. By the end of the movie, I had hit 500! And I felt great. I wasn’t even very sore the next day!

You don’t have to bang out 500 push-ups a night, but instead of sitting there watching TV and eating snacks – drop to the floor and do some push-ups, or abs or squats or whatever else you might want to try. Have some fun with it! You’ll amaze yourself, add some strength, burn some calories and not feel like a slug watching TV!

Train Hard & Train Often!

Coach Phil
Kettlebellking.com

Master Phil Ross poses with New Crowned AMMO Fight League Champion Zack Fox

Master Phil Ross poses with New Crowned AMMO Fight League Champion Zack Fox

South Windsor, CT: AMMO Fight League. On Saturday, May 11th, Zack Fox of the American Eagle MMA/ Team Alliance Fight Team won two divisions and secured the Cruiserweight Submission Fighting Title Belt at the Second AMMO Fight League Championships. The tournament was heavily attended by Gracie Jiu Jitsu Schools and the American Eagle MMA fighter was the only representative from Team Alliance Jiu Jitsu. There were Professional MMA Fighters from the Bellatore as well as Team Link Jiu Jitsu fighters in attendance.

Fox finished two opponents via Submission Armbar and one by a dominant decision enroute his title belt. This is Zack’s 4th Championship in a row. He won 1st at the NAGA Nationals last November, 1st palce at the NAGA World Championships in April and now the AMMO Fight League title winning first place in both Gi and No Gi Competitions.

 

Zack Fox began his Martial Arts training here at American Eagle MMA in June of 2012. However, Zack arrived at the AEMMA Academy with quite a solid list of athletic accomplishments. Zack was a High School All American Lacrosse player for Don Bosco Prep and an NCAA Division 1 Recruit for St. John’s University. Zack was also a Jr. National Power Lifting Champion and now at a weight of 195lbs, has a bench press of 520, a squat of 680 and pulls another 680 in the dead lift.

Despite having no wrestling experience or any other prior combat experience, Zack began competing in Jiu Jitsu after only 5 weeks of training at the AEMMA Academy. He placed second in the White Belt Gi Division after training only 9 weeks and after only 3 months of training he secured his first Championship at the NAGA North American Championships on November 17th, 2012. We are anticipating a lot of achievements from this young competitor. Zack is also HKC Kettlebell Certified and is a personal strength & fitness trainer at the AEMMA Academy.

On April 20th, 2013, Zack Fox added a NAGA World Championship to his list of accomplishments. He won the Cruiserweight, Beginner Title in the No-Gi Competition.

Master Phil Ross poses with his Belt after winning the 2010 No-Gi Expert Division at the Battle of the Beach in Wildwood, NJ.

American Eagle MMA’s Chief Instructor, Master Phil Ross won two First Place Awards in one day while competing in the NAGA Battle at the Beach competition in 2010. He was crowned champion in the Executive No-Gi competition and after only training with a Gi for 3 months, bested 48 competitors in the Gi competition. Master Ross was almost 48 at the time and competed in the 18 to 29 age bracket. He went undefeated and unscored upon throughout the competition and secured two submission victories.

After having won well over 300 fights in various disciplines, Master Ross no longer competes and focuses his energy on training his up and coming fighters, students and conducting seminars.

Coach Phil Ross with Zach Fox and Josh Lay

Coach Phil Ross with Zach Fox and Josh Lay at the NAGA North American Grappling Championships

November 17th, 2012, Newark, NJ: NAGA North American Championship: Essex County College was the site of the North American Grappling Association’s annual North American Championships. The Ho-Ho-Kus based American Eagle MMA & Kettlebell School entered two combatants, Zachary Fox of Wyckoff and Joshua Lay of Ridgewood in the nationally ranked tourney. Zach Fox was crowned the No-Gi Champion in the Cruiserweight Division (under 199.9) and in his first contest ever, Josh Lay took home the Bronze in the Light Heavyweight (Under 189.9) competition.

NAGA, along with Grappler’s Quest are two of the top grappling and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu leagues in the world. This year alone, Master Phil Ross’ Team Alliance BJJ school member, American Eagle MMA, has had four (4) champions crowned at these prestigious events. The also competes in the regional, but highly competitive tournaments hosted by The Good Fight.

 

 

Welcome to Master Phil Ross’ YouTube Channel. Please feel free to take advantage of this opportunity to view one of the World’s Foremost authorities on Martial Arts & Fitness: FREE OF CHARGE! Have fun and expand your training knowledge with the posted workouts, movements and Defensive Tactics.

https://www.youtube.com/user/Diesel1962?feature=guide

Master Phil Ross poses with Kettlebell

Master Trainer Phil Ross poses with Kettlebell

Never Say Die

You hear it all of the time “Never Say Die”. You see the athlete in competition, whether its MMA, a Grappling Match, a Track Meet or a Football game – the sport does not matter, only the actions that lead to the end result. The participant is behind and it seems as if all is lost and then the tide shifts and the athlete that appeared to be done for surges and emerges victorious.

Everyone wants to win. Wanting to win is not the hard part. Sacrificing everyday in your training, your eating habits and ignoring distractions; that is the difficult task. You need to make your training your priority – no room for excuses – make it to your workouts and push yourself to get better, stronger and faster. Excuses for failure are common, find a way to succeed.

How does this happen? How does one develop this “Never Say Die” attitude? Can it be developed? Or is it only in certain people?

There are certain people born with an innate inner toughness, but if it’s not cultivated, they burn out and lose it over time. Others seem to develop, grow tougher and more resilient over time. How is this done?

There is one sure fire way to develop this Never Say Die attitude, Train Hard. Yes, the more that you sacrifice and persevere, the more you become committed to succeed and less you are able to tolerate failure. There are many times when a combatant is in a scramble, they could easily give in and let their opponent win, yet they do not allow this to happen. The time, effort and pain endured in training comes through and they “dig deep” into their soul and put forth another effort. Training with purpose will not only harden your body, but your mind as well.

When you are training, think to yourself “What is my opponent doing? Is he training like I am? Is he sparring those extra rounds, running that additional mile and performing those few more reps? Is he pushing through the pain?” You will never be able to answer those questions, until after the contest. The best chance of success that you have is to train to your best ability and don’t make excuses for not training.

The more that you put in, the more that you will be prepared to win. Take the Samurai for example. They were in Life and Death Battles. If they lost, they were dead. In order to win, they needed to have supreme confidence. They developed this confidence through their daily training regiment and discipline. The tenants espoused by the Samurai are ones that we can base our training on to develop our Never Say Die attitude.

As Always – Train Hard & Train Often.

My Best Friend: Are you a fitness enthusiast that takes their running shoes on trips, only to feel uncomfortable road running in unfamiliar areas? Are you tired of endlessly waiting for cardio equipment to free up at your gym, only to feel like a hamster running on a wheel? Do you love to run outdoors, yet shy away from putting on five layers of under-armor and sweats on in order to brave the sub arctic temperatures?

Well, let me introduce you to my “Best Friend”, the jump rope. You can take it anywhere, you do not need much space, it does not matter what the weather is like outside, you do not need expensive equipment ($2.00 to $20.00 for a rope, my favorite costs $8.00) and you can vary the routines and movements to keep it interesting. My Grandfather was a boxing trainer in Paterson, NJ back in the 30’s, 40’s and into the 50’s. He instructed me on how to jump rope as a teenager as a means to improve my foot speed and endurance for wrestling and football. I then began to realize the incredible benefits of jumping rope.

If you jump rope at a good pace for 5 minutes, it’s equivalent to running a mile! The coordination of your hands and feet moving in rhythm with each other is essential for a fighter. All of my martial arts classes begin with 3 to 5 minutes of jumping rope. In addition to the coordination development, jumping rope is an incredible means to warm up the body.

Even if you are a beginner and you miss on your jump, keep moving your feet. To learn how to jump, here are a couple of tips:

1) Play some music that you like with a good beat. You should put together a playlist for at least the same amount of time that you want to jump for. Use your favorite, upbeat songs & make a mix. Or, for those with obsessive, manic personalities, repeat the same song as an extended version. This also helps you jump rope longer. You basically fool your self into NOT thinking that you are jumping that long.

2) To initially get your timing, watch as the rope hits the ground. That’s when you time your jump. It may take a few weeks to get your timing, but keep working, it will eventually happen.

3) If you are still having issues, try putting the rope in one hand and jump up and down while rotating your wrist. This will help you to find your timing.

4) Remember the less movement of your arms, the better. Your wrists are the primary focus of the rotation. Try also to keep them in the same spot, approximately at the level between the bottom of your chest and the top of your hips. This does not hold true when you are doing more advanced movements, like crossing the rope or double jumps.

5) You do not have to jump very high. You only need to jump high enough to allow the thin rope to pass under your feet. Get your rhythm and all else will fall into place.

If you’d like to workout the rest of your body, try performing push-ups and abdominal exercises in a rotation with jumping rope. You can start with 100 jumps, 20 push – ups and 30 abdominals. Start with 3 rotations and then increase to 5. You may also execute additional push – ups or abdominals. What a great way to start the day!

Victory Favors the Prepared!

http://www.youtube.com/edit?video_id=hr5tT44O4mM&ns=1

If you have any questions or comments, feel free to reach me at  HYPERLINK “http://www.philross.com” www.philross.com.